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May 15 – Volunteer to Pull Garlic Mustard Along Polly Ann Trail in Oxford

May 15 – Volunteer to Pull Garlic Mustard Along Polly Ann Trail in Oxford

Oakland County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (Oakland County CISMA) invites the public to a free webinar and work day to learn to identify and remove invasive garlic mustard as part of National Invasive Species Awareness Week.

On Tuesday May 11 at 7pm, Erica Clites, Oakland County CISMA director, will discuss invasive garlic mustard and dames rocket, as well as other invasive species beginning to emerge such as common reed (Phragmites) and destructive knotweed.

Garlic mustard is an herbaceous plant that has low clusters of leaves in the first year. In the second year, it sends up a flowering stalk and can grow up to three feet tall. The flowers have four white petals and are blooming now. After flowering, each plant can produce thousands of seeds that remain viable in the soil for up to seven years.

Clites explains “Garlic mustard is easy to pull and dispose of in the trash. By removing this invasive species from your yard while they are flowering, you can prevent garlic mustard from spreading to local parks and natural areas! When garlic mustard takes over the understory in wooded areas, we lose lovely and important native species like trillium and trout lily.”

On Saturday May 15 from 9am – noon, you can help representatives from the Oakland County CISMA and Polly Ann Trail remove garlic mustard along the trail in Oxford Township. Trail Manager Linda Moran explains “Once you help pull this invasive species along the trail, you will recognize it and can remove it from your yard. Please come help us keep the trail free of invasive species!”

Emily Messick, Oakland County CISMA technician, adds that “Garlic mustard should be disposed of in the trash as it can develop seeds after it has been removed. If you have a large amount, make sure to label it as invasive species for your disposal company.”

Time will be provided to ask questions of the speaker during the webinar. The virtual event will be held on Zoom. Free registration is required at: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwrceGvqzwuEtRclMzYd-04jm5g0Ka-Leht

Parking will be available for the garlic mustard removal event at 1285 Drahner Road. Please wear long pants, sturdy shoes and bring gloves and a mask! You can register here to indicate your interest: https://forms.gle/VHUBQkSywQmAcdPS7

The Oakland County Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (Oakland County CISMA) is a collaboration of 40+ partners founded in 2014 to support functioning ecosystems and enhance quality of life through invasive species management. Find the  full list of partners here:  https://oaklandinvasivespecies.org/current-members/ Learn more by following Oakland County CISMA on Facebook and watching our videos on YouTube.

Visit the Oakland County Times Event Page for other fun and educational things to do!  To submit an event, email info to editor@oc115.com .  We are currently looking for a sponsor for this section.  Email editor@oc115.com to learn more!

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