The Pros and Cons of Proposal Two

The Pros and Cons of Proposal Two

(League of Women Voters, http://www.lwvmi.org/documents/LWVMIProCon11-12.pdf)

Note:  This information is provided by the League of Women Voters. Find out more about this nonpartisan organization at www.lwvmi.org

PROPOSAL 12 – 2 A PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE STATE CONSTITUTION  REGARDING COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

This proposal would: Grant public and private employees the constitutional right to organize and bargain collectively through labor unions. Invalidate existing or future state or local laws that limit the ability to join unions and bargain collectively, and to negotiate and enforce collective bargaining agreements, including employees’ financial support of their labor unions. Laws may be enacted to prohibit public employees from striking. Override state laws that regulate hours and conditions of employment to the extent that those laws conflict with collective bargaining agreements. Define “employer” as a person or entity employing one or more employees.

Should this proposal be approved? YES ____ NO __

Pro:

Protect Our Jobs asserts: Proposal establishes people’s rights to organize, join or assist unions and to bargain collectively with public or private employers regarding wages, hours and other employment conditions. It prohibits employers from retaliating against employees for exercising those rights, prohibits state and local governments from interfering with those rights, and prohibits government from blocking agreements respecting employees’ financial support to their union . It grants State Civil Service employees’ collective bargaining rights while authorizing the State to restrict or prohibit public employee strikes. It protects current laws establishing minimum wages, hours and working conditions. The proposal doesn’t add any rights workers don’t already have. It doesn’t force people to join unions. It doesn’t require anyone to pay dues. It simply prevents those who want to eliminate worker’s rights from being able to do it. Corporate special interests will spend millions to mislead voters about the proposal so they can pass Right to Work legislation prohibiting agreements between unions and employers on membership and dues payment. Collective bargaining gives workers a voice at work and a seat at the table with management, protecting Michigan’s families and allowing workers to negotiate fair wages and benefits. For more information go to http://protectourjobs.com.

Con:

Protecting Michigan Taxpayers asserts: This proposal enshrines the agenda of Washington D.C. union bosses in Michigan’s Constitution, resulting in higher taxes, a fundamental lack of fairness and fewer jobs. It would take away local control and eliminate the ability of our elected representatives to make decisions that move Michigan forward. Government workers would receive higher pensions and better benefits even during tough economic times, causing lawmakers to roll back recent tax cuts that are fueling Michigan’s turnaround. Nearly 80 laws would be overturned, jeopardizing the state’s progress so far. Our ability to remove bad teachers would be gutted, shortchanging our children’s education. It would be difficult to pass laws to further improve education, protect public safety, and strengthen our economy. Just as no one should be forbidden from joining a union, workers should not be forced to join a union or pay dues to a political organization they don’t support. It’s a special interest power play. Don’t let them hijack our constitution. For more information go to http://protectingmichigantaxpayers.com/.

For Ferndale 115 News coverage of election-related stories, including candidate profiles and League of Women Voters break-downs of the ballot proposals, please visit http://oaklandcounty115.com/category/voter_info/.

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